Australian Hurricane

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AusAnzani
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Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

I had mentioned this one in another thread but never got around to posting any information, so here's the full story.

Let’s kick off with some Australian Hurricane background first.

Hurricane was essentially a small engine manufacturer located in NSW Australia. They produced engines for various lawn mower and outboard companies and in the latter years proceeded to produce their own “Hurricane” stationary engines, lawn mowers and outboard motors as well.

Searching the internet, there are references to 4 Hurricane engine models. Models 125 and 125A are 125cc air cooled engines with a 2 1/8” bore and 2 1/8” stroke. The 125 has a one piece cylinder and head cast iron. The 125A has a cast iron cylinder and a removable alloy head. Models 180 and 185 are 160cc air cooled engines with 2 3/8” bore and 2 1/8” stroke. Both comprise a one piece cylinder and head, the 180 in cast iron and the 185 in aluminium with a liner.

The Hurricane outboard discussed below first appeared on Australian Ebay some months ago. When I saw the advert I knew there was something special about this particular one and immediately made contact with the seller. He didn’t know a lot about it, but invited me over for a look. Hurricane outboards are extremely difficult to find at the best of times, so I couldn’t pass up on the opportunity. On inspection, I noted a number of missing parts and some modifications. We stuffed around a little bit and managed to get a nice spark, and whilst the engine itself matched the description of the model 185, it was water-cooled potentially making it super rare. Awesome.

I departed shortly after and kept an eye on the Ebay advert, which saw very little bidding activity. Then low and behold it disappeared. Bummer, I thought. However as I still the sellers contact details I made another call to him. To cut a long story short, we struck a deal (dirt cheap IMO), and it was mine!

Some pics as purchased. Missing parts include fuel tank, recoil starter and associated mech. At the lower end, a 'grafted' gearbox easily identifiable as not original through the home made intermediate plate. Sourcing original is going to be a challenge, but I guess that’s all part of what we do.

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It basically sat untouched for a few weeks whilst I continued the search for information and parts. I can honestly say after 2 months of extensive searching I’ve only been able to find 3 obscure references on the internet. The first contained no detail other than a low quality thumbnail pic of a re-branded Hurricane outboard with a water-cooled engine taken from an Ebay almost 6 years prior. The second was a mention that someones father 50 odd years ago, fitted a replacement water-cooled powerhead of unknown origin on an early Waterboy Outboard. Following up on both leads resulted in no additional info.

The third reference really got my attention. It was made by well known and respected fellow claiming to have purchased an instruction manual for a previously undocumented Hurricane engine. With nothing to lose I wrote to him. 3-4 days later I received a response with a request for my email address and an offer to provide a scanned copy of said manual ie just on the off chance that it may be of some use to me.

What an understatement that proved to be. The manual was indeed correct for the engine, referred to by Hurricane as a Hurricane Surefire Model 200. The manual also comprised the usual service information and exploded view drawings which will assist in identifying many of the missing parts.

Almost 4 months have now passed since the purchase, and quite a lot of progress on the restoration made. Here’s a few of the progress pics with some commentary.

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Engine removed from trunk. All it's seen at this point is quick once over with wire brush to crankcase and cylinder/head, and a light polish of the brass fittings.

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On separating the crank case and cylinder, it becomes clear this thing has had limited use. Not a lot of carbon build up on the piston. Cylinder liner and rings also appear as new.

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Gasket removed, crank case and cylinder surfaces partially cleaned, piston given a good soak and wipe down. Absolutely no slack in the big or little end. Very pleased so far.

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Re-painted cylinder/head, flywheel and base plate and lightly polished brass and copper fittings. Aside from some prior spanner damage, they've come up pretty nice. I tend to store in plastic or styrene boxes to minimise the possibility of small parts escaping. Stripped down carbs, ignition systems etc are stored in plastic bags, so when I'm ready to work on something it's all there in one place.

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Bit of time spend polishing carb body and various other small components ahead of re-assembly.

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Spent a lot of time reworking the trunk and transom brackets, and although not absolutely perfect, I reckon they've come up ok. I don't have a bead blaster or anything like that so the aluminium was attended to with a wire brush (larger areas) and a dremel (hard to get at areas). All nuts and bolts etc are original, just cleaned up with a wire wheel on the drill press. Literally countless hours spent on these parts.

By comparison re-finishing the chrome on the trunk and carry handle was extremely easy. I hit them with a “mothers” metal polish and fine steel wool. 15 minutes later a few dents and scratches remain, but that adds to the character in my opinion.

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With that out of the way, it was time to start reassembly. The power head (engine), lower dust cover and carry handle are secured by the 4 engine bolts and are therefore fitted together. In other words it goes together very quickly.

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Close up Hugz. I’m sure he will be pleased to know I polished the condenser!

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Although I haven’t got around to sourcing the right spark plug and setting the points yet, I thought I’d whack the flywheel on just to see how she looks so far.

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The search for missing parts continues, and as there’s not much more to do with the parts I have, it will be a while before the next update.

Hope you enjoyed the read.

Regards,
www.vintageoutboardsaustralia.blogspot.com
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Collector Inspector
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by Collector Inspector »

Spiro

Yep, looking great!

What is the drive tube diameter?

I will be speaking to a collector Mate local I think I have some pics somewhere that maybe has something on a back rack with the same clunky exhaust manifold but not sure I will be in contact.

Huggy may be on the lookout as well..............

Doing nicely so far S

Cheers

B
A chicken is one egg's way of becoming others
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

It's nice to know you're alive B,

Several phone calls and text messages to you have gone unanswered. Was starting to get concerned.

To answer your question, drive tube outside diameter is 44mm or 1 11/16". The 'leg' (gearbox section that sits over the drive tube) is correct for this Hurricane and is stamped WP233. See also other info below.

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The correct gearbox is shown in the 'borrowed' image below and will have either a 2 or 3 blade propeller.

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Any assistance identifying (or locating) this gearbox would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks & Regards,
www.vintageoutboardsaustralia.blogspot.com
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Collector Inspector
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by Collector Inspector »

Ahhhhhh............................That is the same lower unit as was the "Clipper".

I will email you some info and a contact locally to me ie I will forward his email just know.

You could get lucky aye!

B
A chicken is one egg's way of becoming others
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

Clipper for the trunk and transom brackets etc is correct B,

Check your pm's. I've sent you the only 'Clipper' pic I have which shows a different gearbox and leg section.

It's possible the made a variety of models though.

Regards,
www.vintageoutboardsaustralia.blogspot.com
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Stelios_Rjk
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by Stelios_Rjk »

You did your tricks again, aye? It amazing to see before and after!
I love the 10600/145 turns!!!
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

Thank you Stelios :wink:

A few more g/box pics for you B. Please don't forget it's water-cooled so the right gearbox will have a water pick up and water pump.

Another angle of above-mentioned gearbox.

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This one taken from another Hurricane with water-cooled engine, also has a 3-blade prop.

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Sorry about the poor image quality. They are the only ones I've been able to find anywhere.

Thanks again & regards,
Spiro
www.vintageoutboardsaustralia.blogspot.com
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Charles uk
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by Charles uk »

Are we taking 60's here or later?
Looks well engineered for that era of manufacture with a few obvious cost savings.
Has it ball race mains & needle bigends & bronze oil seals?
Tell tale in the top of leg casting?
Do you have a pic up the bore showing the port configuration?
Any idea of the hp rating?
Very interesting!
Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot.
chris
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by chris »

was it a hurricane motor used in the air cooled waterboy
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

Here you go Charles. Easier to respond this way.
Charles uk wrote:Are we taking 60's here or later?
Whilst there are no dates available, it is believed Hurricane was in existence during the 50’s and very early 60’s. The Surefire 200 was introduced later in their existence, making it a late 50’s/early 60’s engine.

Looks well engineered for that era of manufacture with a few obvious cost savings.

Has it ball race mains & needle bigends & bronze oil seals?
Two ball bearings at the drive end, 1 ball bearing at the non-drive end, needle bearings on the big end and rubber oil seals.

Tell tale in the top of leg casting?
Not quite, what you’re seeing there is part of the water pick-up. There is a pipe (currently missing) that connects this to the side of the cylinder. Water exits top of the cylinder, into the exhaust manifold and out through the drive tube/exhaust port. Refer my 1st post, 3rd pic in this thread.

Do you have a pic up the bore showing the port configuration?
Sorry, no. I neglected to take a photo whilst separated from the crankcase.

Any idea of the hp rating?
5hp, 4,300rpm max.

Very interesting!
Yes, indeed. That’s why I bought it.
Last edited by AusAnzani on Mon Sep 22, 2014 12:57 am, edited 2 times in total.
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

chris wrote:was it a hurricane motor used in the air cooled waterboy
G'day Chris, whilst unconfirmed it appears Waterboy used Hurricane Engines exclusively. Details as follows:
3hp outboard - 125 engine
5hp outboard - 180 engine
Both have a single piece cylinder and head made of cast iron.

There is also mention of a 6hp Waterboy outboard that appears to comprise yet another 'unknown' Hurricane Engine. This is said to be similar to the 180 with a detachable alloy head with max rpm increased from 4,300 to 5,500.

Hope that helps.

Regards,
www.vintageoutboardsaustralia.blogspot.com
chris
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by chris »

thanks ausanzani, my 1st outboard was a 3hp waterboy, not very reliable as it was hard to start when hot but when it was running it would keep going till it ran out of fuel, it was noisy snd rattly, a seagull was my 2nd outboard and was a pleasure to use after the waterboy. All this was in the early to mid 70's
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

chris wrote:thanks ausanzani, my 1st outboard was a 3hp waterboy, not very reliable as it was hard to start when hot but when it was running it would keep going till it ran out of fuel, it was noisy snd rattly, a seagull was my 2nd outboard and was a pleasure to use after the waterboy. All this was in the early to mid 70's
Chris, I reckon that description applies to just about every 2 stroke motor ever built including Seagulls (dare i say) and currenr generation models.

Maintenance, or should I say lack thereof, is what makes many of them seem less reliable, noisier and more rattly than others.
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AusAnzani
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Re: Australian Hurricane

Post by AusAnzani »

It's been a while since my last update, but in reality there hasn't been a whole lot of progress to talk about anyway.

Have spent a lot of time reworking and polishing the Muffler and Leg (mount for gearbox) to a chrome like finish and have refitted those to the outboard. I also spent countless hours reworking the Throttle Lever but can't refit that until I source a replacement tiller tube. The original tiller had been broken and re-welded by the previous owner and doesn't look quite right on a restored outboard.

A few quick pics.

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If only maintaining a lawn was as easy as restoring an outboard. Hard work at this time of year, and even more so when there's a pair of dogs making a mess of it.

More down the track.
www.vintageoutboardsaustralia.blogspot.com
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