An intresting boat for a seagull?

Talk about and buy or sell boats that are suited to Seagull outboards here

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THCL500J8
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An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by THCL500J8 » Tue Oct 20, 2015 9:06 am

DKG LATE MODEL SURF BOAT 8M

surf boat.JPG


Any thoughts from anyone, would you build a motor well, or mount it on the stern.
You would need a 12 foot tiller extension, and the trailer would be a pain.
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Charles uk
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Charles uk » Tue Oct 20, 2015 9:43 am

There are a lot of Seagull racers that would love that & who would put out a contract on you if you cut a "motor well" in it!

What does it weigh? approx.
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THCL500J8
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by THCL500J8 » Tue Oct 20, 2015 2:44 pm

Its a stripped out hull, so it would weigh about 180kg.
TC - 1960 LLS - 1961 LLS - 1966 THCL - 1968 EFNRL - 1986

Adrian Dale
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Adrian Dale » Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:00 pm

Re the surf boat do you have any measurement other than the overall length? I have seen them competing off Sydney on the TV and wonder how stable they are, in the competitions they seem to spend more time capsized than the right way up! At 8 meter (26ft) it would give a hull speed of close to 8knots but stability? what is their beam, draft and freeboard, Can you post some more pictures please if you have any.

I guess you know where I am going with this!

AJ

THCL500J8
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by THCL500J8 » Fri Oct 30, 2015 2:12 am

These are excellent boat for what they are designed to do, but nothing else.
They are of vacuum bag foam and glass construction, and made in two parts, the hull and the deck.

So if you were to seagullise one, though it would never sink, it would require a new glass deck to be built and bonded to the hull.

The deck has four raised seat towers for the strokes that take up most of the boat.

surfboat_84.jpg


The well you can see at the top of the picture is were the seep stands.
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Collector Inspector
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Collector Inspector » Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:51 am

Adrian

I am of the opinion that this type of hull is generally of single purpose.

Not something to be "At Sea" in.

Watch a surf carnival one day. They Twist and rebound alarmingly.

500m off shore aye...nothing more as to your thoughts.

Just Saying is all.

B
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Charles uk
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Charles uk » Fri Oct 30, 2015 3:33 pm

Interesting you say that Bruce I've been having a conversation with a few Bermudians over the last couple of years about building a hull based on these for the RISR (Round the Island Seagull Race), no rocker, lightish when without the internal skin & designed for big water.

The cost of the mould & the bow buoyancy was the slow down factor, an 80lb hull with a 50lb propulsion unit 5hp 5R, 30lbs of fuel 300lbs of crew sitting on the floor & a centre of gravity on or below the waterline, sounds a lot better better than a 180lb hull with 800lb propulsion unit producing just about 2 hp & a centre of gravity 250mm or more above the waterline.

As for the Bass Straight I think it might be a lot more comfortable than a half ton estuary clinker & quite a bit quicker, but just as wet.

As for the carnival performance it's their job to make them look sexy! it's the dare devils that pull the ladies.

Has anyone tried one with a less than 5hp motor?
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Adrian Dale » Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:15 pm

Interesting discussion, with the Bass Strait the seas will be quartering or beam thus excluding a straight line course. With the surf boat, the narrow hull will undoubtable make the distance to travel much longer due to the need to keep the waves off the beam. As for 'wetness" the intention with the dingy is to partially deck over with canvas thus making a semi dry area for'd. Comfort, well we are not doing it for comfort but need to be practical and so seating and clothing will be given most carful consideration. Under the canvas we will have a pipe berth to get a few hours rest

looking at the surf boat the internal design would not work and a new deck would be needed. All too much $ and difficulty for something that would be highly experimental. for the RSIR the requirements are very different, for a start only 5hours or so are needed not, potentially, 36++ hours. Also the course is predominately heading into or running with the swell making the long narrow wave piercing boats highly efficient so, yes for this, a surf boat, if kept light enough, would be good. Also if you capsize in the race some one will be there in minutes to pick you up and tow the boat back. No such luxury in the Bass Strait!!


We will keep looking I know just what I want I just cant lay my hands on it yet. Proving to be problematical.

AJ

THCL500J8
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by THCL500J8 » Sat Oct 31, 2015 9:16 am

Good luck with the plan, if you want to share with us, what you want as a boat, we as a group cover a lot of ground.
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Charles uk
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Charles uk » Sun Nov 01, 2015 1:01 am

I think you'll find the name describes what this style of hull's for AJ, surf boat, & the fastest speed you'll get surfing, is along the face of a wave running slightly down hill.
But the fastest speeds you get when Seagull racing is 5 degrees off the length of a wave direction on the trailing face, a beam swell is a racers dream, there's a lot of difference between a "in the water" hull & an "out of the water hull" as you'll learn.

Borrow a long style boat, find a decent swell & find out for yourself how much value all this development work the racers have done, holds for the bass straight beam swell conditions.
Make it idiot proof and someone will make a better idiot.

Adrian Dale
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Re: An intresting boat for a seagull?

Post by Adrian Dale » Mon Nov 02, 2015 2:58 am

you hit the nail on the head Charles when you said "Swell conditions..."

The Bass strait will have swells but the real problem is the short steep cross seas that are frequently breaking, particularly through the heads. such seas are not for surfing and the surf boats are not designed for them.

Having said that I do appreciate the advantages of an on water boat rather than a in water deep draft vessel. Sailing in the Sydney Hobart in a one tonner in the 90's gave an amazing ride down massive waves flying a storm spinnaker. Speeds of up to 20+ knots were achieved that could never have reached with a deep full keel.

But we are not sailing nor surfing and so for practicality I believe the heavy displacement will give the greatest chance of success.. slower but less risk.

AJ

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